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CASHEW NUTS

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Description

Amount Per 100 grams

Calories 553
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 44 g 67%
Saturated fat 8 g 40%
Polyunsaturated fat 8 g
Monounsaturated fat 24 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 12 mg 0%
Potassium 660 mg 18%
Total Carbohydrate 30 g 10%
Dietary fiber 3.3 g 13%
Sugar 6 g
Protein 18 g 36%
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 3% Iron 37%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 20%
Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 73%
*Per cent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Cashews are a type of nut with a soft consistency and sweet flavor.

They are native to South America, specifically Brazil, and were introduced by colonists to Africa and India. These regions are the largest producers of cashews today. Cashews are sold both raw or roasted, and salted or unsalted.

Cashews have recently been used to make dairy alternatives, such as cashew milk, cashew-based cheese and cashew-based cream sauces and sour cream.

This article is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods.

It gives information on the nutritional value of cashews and their possible health benefits. You will also find some tips on how to include cashews in the diet and learn about any possible health risks.

  • 157 calories
  • 8.56 grams (g) of carbohydrate
  • 1.68 g of sugar
  • 0.9 g of fiber
  • 5.17 g of protein
  • 12.43 g of total fat
  • 10 milligrams (mg) of calcium
  • 1.89 mg of iron
  • 83 mg of magnesium
  • 168 mg of phosphorus
  • 187 mg of potassium
  • 3 mg of sodium
  • 1.64 mg of zinc

Cashews also contain vitamins C and B, including 7 micrograms (mcg) of DFE folate.

A 1-ounce serving of cashews is about 18 whole cashews. Cashews are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and a good source of protein.

Benefits

Consuming a high proportion of plant-based foods appears to reduce the risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions.

Heart health

The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids found in cashews can help decrease LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and heart attack.

A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition showed that the risk of coronary heart disease may be 37 percentTrusted Source lower in people who consume nuts more than four times per week compared with people who never or seldom consume nuts.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have approved a health claim for food labels that “eating 1.5 oz per day of most nuts as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.”

Cashews are a good source of magnesium, which plays an important role in over 300 enzymatic reactions within the body.

These include the metabolism of food and synthesis of fatty acids and proteins.

Magnesium is also involved in muscle relaxation and neuromuscular transmission and activity.

Magnesium deficiency, prevalent in older populations, is linked to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease and osteoporosis.

Several studies have found that a high intake of calcium without sufficient magnesium could increase the riskTrusted Source of arterial calcification and cardiovascular disease, as well as kidney stones.

People with the highest intake of magnesium were found in the Framingham Heart Study to have a 58-percent lower chanceTrusted Source of having coronary artery calcification and a 34-percent lower chance of abdominal artery calcification.

Weight management
Limited data suggest that routine nut consumption is associated with a higher expenditure of energyTrusted Source while resting. This could have implications for weight management.

In addition, in trials that compare weight loss between food regimens that include or exclude nuts, regimes that include nut consumption in moderation were linked to greater weight lossTrusted Source.

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2004 found that women who reported rarely eating nuts had a greater incidence of weight gainTrusted Source over an 8-year period than women who consumed nuts two or more times a week.

The researchers concluded that eating nuts does not lead to a weight gain, and that it may help maintain a healthy weight.

A review of studies published in 2017 concluded thatTrusted Source nuts can help maintain a healthy weight. They may do this by helping a person feel full and contributing to thermogenesis, which is the production of heat in the body. This can help boost the metabolism.

Gallstones
According to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, frequent nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of needing surgery to remove the gallbladder.

In over a million people documented over a time span of 20 years, women who consumed more than 5 ounces of nuts a week had a significantly lower riskTrusted Source of cholecystectomy than women who ate less than 1 ounce of nuts each week.

Bone health
Cashews are one of the few food sources that are high in copper. One ounce of cashews contains 622 micrograms of copper. For adults aged 19 years and over, the recommended intake for copper each day is 900 micrograms.

Severe copper deficiency is associated with lower bone mineral density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. More research is needed, however, on the effects of marginal copper deficiency and the potential benefits of copper supplementation for prevention and management of osteoporosis.

Copper also plays an important role in the maintenance of collagen and elastin, major structural components of our bodies. Without sufficient copper, the body cannot replace damaged connective tissue or the collagen that makes up the scaffolding for bone. This can lead to a range of problems, including joint dysfunction as bodily tissues begin to break down.

The magnesium in cashews is also important for bone formation as it helps with the assimilation of calcium into the bone. Manganese, another mineral in cashews, has been shown to prevent osteoporosisTrusted Source in combination with calcium and copper.

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Dig deeper into the health topics you care about most. Subscribe to our facts-first newsletter today.

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Your privacy is important to us. Any information you provide to us via this website may be placed by us on servers located in countries outside of the EU. If you do not agree to such placement, do not provide the information.

Diet
Cashews make a tasty addition to stir-fry dishes.
Nuts have a high-fat content, and they can become rancid. Keeping cashews in a cool, dark and dry place can improve their shelf life.

If stored properly, cashews will keep for a few months at room temperature, a year in the refrigerator or 2 years in the freezer.

Rancid nuts are not unsafe but have a sharp flavor most people find unpleasant.

Quick tips:

Make homemade trail mix with a mixture of cashews and other nuts, seeds, and dried fruit
Make your own cashew butter (like peanut butter) by blending whole, raw cashews in a food processor until smooth
Top main dishes such as fish or chicken with a mixture of chopped cashews and herbs before baking
Mix cashews into your next salad or stir fry
Use cashew milk as an alternative to dairy milk
Or, try these healthy and delicious recipes developed by registered dietitians:

Baked halibut with garlicky kale and toasted cashews
Mason jar lentil salad
Sweet chilli chicken and cashew stir fry
Apart from plain and roasted cashews, other cashew products include cashew nut butter, cashew oil, and cashew-based beauty products. These are available for purchase online.

Risks
Cashews contain fat, but these are mostly unsaturated fats, which are healthful in moderate quantities.

Truly raw cashews are not safe to eat, as they contain a substance known as urushiol, found in poison ivy. Urushiol is toxic, and contact with it can trigger a skin reaction in some people.

Cashew kernels are often sold as “raw” in stores, but these have been steamed. This removes the toxins. These cashews are healthful.

Depending on the brand, salted and roasted cashews can contain high levels of salt and fat, which may not be healthful. It is best to check the label first and consume these nuts in small quantities.

People who have a nut allergy should avoid cashews, as they contain potent allergens that can lead to reactions, including life-threatening anaphylactic shock.

Overall, it is better to eat a diet with variety than to concentrate on individual foods as the key to good health.

 

 

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DescriptionBuy Cashew Nuts at ECOFOODLLC.COM To buy Cashew Nuts in Bulk, please send us a quote request by filling out the form. We provide a wide range of logistics options in transporting your products from the factory warehouse to your desired destination. Our Shipping rates are determined by the distance between storage warehouse and your delivery point, plus any additional taxes imposed by local authorities. The total shipping & handling cost will be listed under Order SummaryBuy Almond Nuts at ECOFOODLLC.COM To buy Almond Nuts in Bulk, please send us a quote request by filling out the form. We provide a wide range of logistics options in transporting your products from the factory warehouse to your desired destination. Our Shipping rates are determined by the distance between storage warehouse and your delivery point, plus any additional taxes imposed by local authorities. The total shipping & handling cost will be listed under Order SummaryBuy Groundnut at ECOFOODLLC.COM To buy Groundnut in Bulk, please send us a quote request by filling out the form. We provide a wide range of logistics options in transporting your products from the factory warehouse to your desired destination. Our Shipping rates are determined by the distance between storage warehouse and your delivery point, plus any additional taxes imposed by local authorities. The total shipping & handling cost will be listed under Order SummaryBuy Walnut Kernels at ECOFOODLLC.COM To buy Walnut Kernels in Bulk, please send us a quote request by filling out the form. We provide a wide range of logistics options in transporting your products from the factory warehouse to your desired destination. Our Shipping rates are determined by the distance between storage warehouse and your delivery point, plus any additional taxes imposed by local authorities. The total shipping & handling cost will be listed under Order Summary
Content
Amount Per 100 grams Calories 553 % Daily Value* Total Fat 44 g 67% Saturated fat 8 g 40% Polyunsaturated fat 8 g Monounsaturated fat 24 g Cholesterol 0 mg 0% Sodium 12 mg 0% Potassium 660 mg 18% Total Carbohydrate 30 g 10% Dietary fiber 3.3 g 13% Sugar 6 g Protein 18 g 36% Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 3% Iron 37% Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 20% Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 73% *Per cent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Cashews are a type of nut with a soft consistency and sweet flavor.

They are native to South America, specifically Brazil, and were introduced by colonists to Africa and India. These regions are the largest producers of cashews today. Cashews are sold both raw or roasted, and salted or unsalted. Cashews have recently been used to make dairy alternatives, such as cashew milk, cashew-based cheese and cashew-based cream sauces and sour cream. This article is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. It gives information on the nutritional value of cashews and their possible health benefits. You will also find some tips on how to include cashews in the diet and learn about any possible health risks.
  • 157 calories
  • 8.56 grams (g) of carbohydrate
  • 1.68 g of sugar
  • 0.9 g of fiber
  • 5.17 g of protein
  • 12.43 g of total fat
  • 10 milligrams (mg) of calcium
  • 1.89 mg of iron
  • 83 mg of magnesium
  • 168 mg of phosphorus
  • 187 mg of potassium
  • 3 mg of sodium
  • 1.64 mg of zinc
Cashews also contain vitamins C and B, including 7 micrograms (mcg) of DFE folate. A 1-ounce serving of cashews is about 18 whole cashews. Cashews are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and a good source of protein.
Benefits
Consuming a high proportion of plant-based foods appears to reduce the risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions.

Heart health

The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids found in cashews can help decrease LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and heart attack. A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition showed that the risk of coronary heart disease may be 37 percentTrusted Source lower in people who consume nuts more than four times per week compared with people who never or seldom consume nuts. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have approved a health claim for food labels that “eating 1.5 oz per day of most nuts as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.” Cashews are a good source of magnesium, which plays an important role in over 300 enzymatic reactions within the body. These include the metabolism of food and synthesis of fatty acids and proteins. Magnesium is also involved in muscle relaxation and neuromuscular transmission and activity. Magnesium deficiency, prevalent in older populations, is linked to insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease and osteoporosis. Several studies have found that a high intake of calcium without sufficient magnesium could increase the riskTrusted Source of arterial calcification and cardiovascular disease, as well as kidney stones. People with the highest intake of magnesium were found in the Framingham Heart Study to have a 58-percent lower chanceTrusted Source of having coronary artery calcification and a 34-percent lower chance of abdominal artery calcification. Weight management Limited data suggest that routine nut consumption is associated with a higher expenditure of energyTrusted Source while resting. This could have implications for weight management. In addition, in trials that compare weight loss between food regimens that include or exclude nuts, regimes that include nut consumption in moderation were linked to greater weight lossTrusted Source. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2004 found that women who reported rarely eating nuts had a greater incidence of weight gainTrusted Source over an 8-year period than women who consumed nuts two or more times a week. The researchers concluded that eating nuts does not lead to a weight gain, and that it may help maintain a healthy weight. A review of studies published in 2017 concluded thatTrusted Source nuts can help maintain a healthy weight. They may do this by helping a person feel full and contributing to thermogenesis, which is the production of heat in the body. This can help boost the metabolism. Gallstones According to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, frequent nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of needing surgery to remove the gallbladder. In over a million people documented over a time span of 20 years, women who consumed more than 5 ounces of nuts a week had a significantly lower riskTrusted Source of cholecystectomy than women who ate less than 1 ounce of nuts each week. Bone health Cashews are one of the few food sources that are high in copper. One ounce of cashews contains 622 micrograms of copper. For adults aged 19 years and over, the recommended intake for copper each day is 900 micrograms. Severe copper deficiency is associated with lower bone mineral density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. More research is needed, however, on the effects of marginal copper deficiency and the potential benefits of copper supplementation for prevention and management of osteoporosis. Copper also plays an important role in the maintenance of collagen and elastin, major structural components of our bodies. Without sufficient copper, the body cannot replace damaged connective tissue or the collagen that makes up the scaffolding for bone. This can lead to a range of problems, including joint dysfunction as bodily tissues begin to break down. The magnesium in cashews is also important for bone formation as it helps with the assimilation of calcium into the bone. Manganese, another mineral in cashews, has been shown to prevent osteoporosisTrusted Source in combination with calcium and copper. MEDICAL NEWS TODAY NEWSLETTER Knowledge is power. Get our free daily newsletter. Dig deeper into the health topics you care about most. Subscribe to our facts-first newsletter today. Enter your email Your privacy is important to us. Any information you provide to us via this website may be placed by us on servers located in countries outside of the EU. If you do not agree to such placement, do not provide the information. Diet Cashews make a tasty addition to stir-fry dishes. Nuts have a high-fat content, and they can become rancid. Keeping cashews in a cool, dark and dry place can improve their shelf life. If stored properly, cashews will keep for a few months at room temperature, a year in the refrigerator or 2 years in the freezer. Rancid nuts are not unsafe but have a sharp flavor most people find unpleasant. Quick tips: Make homemade trail mix with a mixture of cashews and other nuts, seeds, and dried fruit Make your own cashew butter (like peanut butter) by blending whole, raw cashews in a food processor until smooth Top main dishes such as fish or chicken with a mixture of chopped cashews and herbs before baking Mix cashews into your next salad or stir fry Use cashew milk as an alternative to dairy milk Or, try these healthy and delicious recipes developed by registered dietitians: Baked halibut with garlicky kale and toasted cashews Mason jar lentil salad Sweet chilli chicken and cashew stir fry Apart from plain and roasted cashews, other cashew products include cashew nut butter, cashew oil, and cashew-based beauty products. These are available for purchase online. Risks Cashews contain fat, but these are mostly unsaturated fats, which are healthful in moderate quantities. Truly raw cashews are not safe to eat, as they contain a substance known as urushiol, found in poison ivy. Urushiol is toxic, and contact with it can trigger a skin reaction in some people. Cashew kernels are often sold as “raw” in stores, but these have been steamed. This removes the toxins. These cashews are healthful. Depending on the brand, salted and roasted cashews can contain high levels of salt and fat, which may not be healthful. It is best to check the label first and consume these nuts in small quantities. People who have a nut allergy should avoid cashews, as they contain potent allergens that can lead to reactions, including life-threatening anaphylactic shock. Overall, it is better to eat a diet with variety than to concentrate on individual foods as the key to good health.    
1. Almonds Deliver a Massive Amount of Nutrients Almonds are the edible seeds of Prunus dulcis, more commonly called the almond tree. They are native to the Middle East, but the US is now the world’s largest producer. The almonds you can buy in stores usually have the shell removed, revealing the edible nut inside. They are sold either raw or roasted. They are also used to produce almond milk, oil, butter, flour or paste — also known as marzipan. Almonds boast an impressive nutrient profile. A 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of almonds contains (1): Fiber: 3.5 grams Protein: 6 grams Fat: 14 grams (9 of which are monounsaturated) Vitamin E: 37% of the RDI Manganese: 32% of the RDI Magnesium: 20% of the RDI They also contain a decent amount of copper, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and phosphorus. This is all from a small handful, which supplies only 161 calories and 2.5 grams of digestible carbohydrates. It is important to note that your body does not absorb 10–15% of their calories because some of the fat is inaccessible to digestive enzymes (2Trusted Source, 3Trusted Source). Almonds are also high in phytic acid, a substance that binds certain minerals and prevents them from being absorbed. While phytic acid is generally considered a healthy antioxidant, it also slightly reduces the amount of iron, zinc and calcium you get from almonds. 2. Almonds Are Loaded With Antioxidants Almonds are a fantastic source of antioxidants. Antioxidants help protect against oxidative stress, which can damage molecules in your cells and contribute to inflammation, aging and diseases like cancer (4Trusted Source, 5Trusted Source). The powerful antioxidants in almonds are largely concentrated in the brown layer of the skin (6Trusted Source, 7Trusted Source, 8Trusted Source). For this reason, blanched almonds — those with skin removed — are not the best choice from a health perspective. A clinical trial in 60 male smokers found that about 3 ounces (84 grams) of almonds per day reduced oxidative stress biomarkers by 23–34% over a four-week period (9Trusted Source). These findings support those of another study which found that eating almonds with main meals reduced some markers of oxidative damage 3. Almonds Are High in Vitamin E Vitamin E is a family of fat-soluble antioxidants. These antioxidants tend to build up in cell membranes in your body, protecting your cells from oxidative damage. Almonds are among the world’s best sources of vitamin E, with just 1 ounce providing 37% of the RDI (1). Several studies have linked higher vitamin E intake with lower rates of heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease 4. Almonds Can Assist With Blood Sugar Control Nuts are low in carbs but high in healthy fats, protein and fiber. This makes them a perfect choice for people with diabetes. Another boon of almonds is their remarkably high amount of magnesium. Magnesium is a mineral involved in more than 300 bodily processes, including blood sugar control (17Trusted Source). The current RDI for magnesium is 310–420 mg. 2 ounces of almonds provide almost half that amount — 150 mg of this important mineral (1). Interestingly, 25–38% of people with type 2 diabetes are deficient in magnesium. Correcting this deficiency significantly lowers blood sugar levels and improves insulin function (18Trusted Source, 19Trusted Source, 20Trusted Source). People without diabetes also see major reductions in insulin resistance when supplementing with magnesium (21Trusted Source, 22Trusted Source). This indicates that high-magnesium foods such as almonds may help prevent metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, both of which are major health problems. 5. Magnesium Also Benefits Blood Pressure Levels The magnesium in almonds may additionally help lower blood pressure levels. High blood pressure is one of the leading drivers of heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure. A deficiency in magnesium is strongly linked to high blood pressure regardless of whether you are overweight (23Trusted Source, 24Trusted Source, 25Trusted Source). Studies show that correcting a magnesium deficiency can lead to major reductions in blood pressure (26Trusted Source, 27Trusted Source). If you do not meet the dietary recommendations for magnesium, adding almonds to your diet could have a huge impact. 6. Almonds Can Lower Cholesterol Levels High levels of LDL lipoproteins in your blood — also known as “bad” cholesterol — is a well-known risk factor for heart disease. Your diet can have major effects on LDL levels. Some studies have shown almonds to effectively lower LDL. A 16-week study in 65 people with prediabetes found that a diet providing 20% of calories from almonds lowered LDL cholesterol levels by an average of 12.4 mg/dL (28Trusted Source). Another study found that eating 1.5 ounces (42 grams) of almonds per day lowered LDL cholesterol by 5.3 mg/dL while maintaining “good” HDL cholesterol. Participants also lost belly fat

Amount Per 100 grams Calories 567 % Daily Value* Total Fat 49 g 75% Saturated fat 7 g 35% Polyunsaturated fat 16 g Monounsaturated fat 24 g Cholesterol 0 mg 0% Sodium 18 mg 0% Potassium 705 mg 20% Total Carbohydrate 16 g 5% Dietary fiber 9 g 36% Sugar 4 g Protein 26 g 52% Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 9% Iron 25% Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 15% Cobalamin 0% Magnesium 42% *Per cent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

1. PEANUTS ARE NOT NUTS.

Just because the word “nut” is in their name doesn’t make them nuts. Peanuts are actually legumes! These tasty and popular little legumes grow underground and not on trees like real nuts such as chestnuts, hazelnuts, and acorns. Peanuts are edible seeds inside pods and are part of the Leguminosae family along with soybeans, chickpeas, peas, clover, licorice, and lentils. But for the sake of utter confusion, total chaos, and meltdowns around the world, let's just call them nuts.

2. THEY’RE GOOD FOR YOU.

Peanuts are a great source of protein. They also contain other healthy nutrients, minerals, antioxidants, and vitamins. The amino acids in the protein are needed for growth and development.

3. PEANUT BUTTER IS A BRILLIANT INVENTION.

So who first thought of turning these tasty little legumes into a paste in the first place? Researchers believe the ancient Aztecs started mashing up peanuts hundreds of years ago. A more modern version began to surface in the 1890s.

4. THERE ARE OVER 500 PEANUTS IN EVERY JAR OF PEANUT BUTTER.

It takes approximately 540 peanuts to make one 12-ounce jar of peanut butter. If you are good at math you can figure out that’s about 45 peanuts in every ounce of peanut butter.

5. SOMEONE IS GETTING RICH OFF OF PEANUTS.

In the United States, one of the world’s leading peanut exporters, peanuts are the 18th most valuable crop. The average yearly export is between 200,000 and 250,000 metric tons!

6. AN EARLY INTRODUCTION OF PEANUTS INTO ONE'S DIET CAN REDUCE THE LIKELIHOOD OF PEANUT ALLERGIES.

In a study recently published in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from the United Kingdom and the United States announced that early introduction of peanuts dramatically reduced the prevalence of peanut allergies, even if the child stopped eating peanuts when he or she got older. This confirms the guess that the very low rate of peanut allergies in Israel can be attributed to the popularity of Bamba, a puffed peanut snack available in some U.S. grocery stores.

7. AMERICAN PRESIDENTS LOVE PEANUTS.

Well, at least two of them did: Former Presidents Thomas Jefferson and Jimmy Carter were both peanut farmers! Jefferson was the first U.S. President known to grow peanuts. Carter’s connection to peanut farming dates back to his parents’ 360-acre farm; Carter himself began selling peanuts on the streets when he was only five years old.

8. PEANUT BUTTER IS ONLY PEANUT BUTTER IF PEANUTS MAKE UP 90 PERCENT OF ITS RECIPE.

These days there are so many brands of peanut butter to choose from, it can be hard to pick a favorite. But to actually be called “peanut butter,” the jar must contain 90 percent peanuts. This applies to traditional and natural peanut butter. The other ingredients in some jars may include oil, sugar or salt.

9. THERE’S A WORD FOR THE FEAR OF HAVING PEANUT BUTTER STICK TO THE ROOF OF YOUR MOUTH.

Arachibutyrophobia is the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth.

10. SOME PEOPLE MAKE A PRACTICE OUT OF THROWING PEANUTS.

According to Guinness World Records, Colin Jackson holds the record for throwing a peanut the farthest—a total of 37.92 meters (or 124 feet, four inches). Which is hardly surprising considering this U.K. athlete is a former world champion hurdler, which means he’s had lots of practice breaking records.

11. PEANUT SHELLS HAVE MULTIPLE USES.

Leftover peanut shells can be used to make kitty litter, kindling, fireplace logs, or compost! If you use them as packing material, you are even helping out the environment as they are eco-friendly!
Walnut Kernels not only add crunch and taste to a dish, but they are loaded with nutritional benefits too. Walnut not only tastes great but are a rich source of heart-healthy, fats and an excellent source of those hard to find omega 3 fatty acids. Walnuts are vacuum packaged to retain freshness, taste and texture ensuring quality. Adding walnuts to your diet may help you to maintain your ideal weight over time. Researchers showed that consuming walnuts on regular basis may help you to reduce stress and age growth as it is found to consist of vitamin-e and anti-oxidants multivitamins- walnuts contain several neuroprotective compounds, including vitamin e, vitamin b, folate, melatonin, omega-3 fats and antioxidants health benefits-walnuts are primarily made up of polyunsaturated fat. Nutritional Facts   Calories: 210, Carbs: 8 g, Fat: 18 g, otein: 7 g. How to Use Walnut is being crushed often to sprinkle over salads, desserts, particularly sundaes and other ice creams and are also used as seafood toppings. Best accompanied with tea or for an on the go munch. Pop some before hitting the gym or spruce up your salad or morning cereal. Benefits Walnuts have a wealth of good kind of fats - polyunsaturated fats, which are better than saturated fats. They also have a high amount of omega-3 fatty acids. Walnuts can help lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in particular but also lower your cholesterol overall. Super Plant Source of Omega-3s. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database, 1 cup of unbranded, organic walnuts (30 grams). Energy: 200 calories Carbohydrate 3.89 grams (g) Sugar: 1 g Fiber: 2 g Protein: 5 g Fat: 20 g Calcium: 20 milligrams (mg) Iron: 0.72 mg Sodium: 0 mg Walnuts are also a good source of: manganese copper magnesium phosphorus vitamin B6 iron They are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids. They are also a good source of protein. Nuts have a reputation for being a high-calorie and high-fat food. However, they are dense in nutrients and provide heart-healthy fats. The combination of healthy fats, protein, and fiber in walnuts helps to increase satisfaction and fullness. This makes them more healthful as a snack, compared with chips, crackers, and other simple carbohydrate foods. Health benefits Consuming plant-based foods of all kinds has long been associated with a reduced risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions. The possible health benefits of walnuts may include boosting the cardiovascular system and bone health, reducing the risk of gallbladder disease, and treating epilepsy. Heart health Share on Pinterest Walnuts may boost heart health. The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids found in walnuts have been shown to decrease LDL (harmful) cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This, in turn, reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and heart attack. A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition showed that the risk of coronary heart disease is 37 percent lowerTrusted Source for those consuming nuts more than four times per week, compared to those who never or rarely consumed nuts. In 2013, scientists published findings of a small study which: walnut oil can benefit endothelial function whole walnuts can enhance the process of eliminating “bad” LDL cholesterol Results of a meta-analysis published in 2009  a diet that is high in walnuts is linked to improved lipid and cholesterol profiles. The researchers also concluded that walnuts may also help reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. In 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the claimTrusted Source for food labels on a variety of nuts, including walnuts, that: “Eating 1.5 ounces per day of most nuts as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.” FDA However, they note that while scientific evidence suggests that this is true, it does not prove it. The statement also refers to whole or chopped nuts, and not products that contain nuts. Weight management According to research published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, routine nut consumption is associated with higher levels of energy use while resting. In trials that compared weight loss using diets that include or exclude nuts, the diets that included nuts in moderation showed greater weight loss. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition also found that women who reported rarely eating nuts had a greater incidenceTrusted Source of weight gain over an 8-year period than those who consumed nuts two times a week or more. Gallstone disease According to another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, frequent nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cholecystectomy, an operation to remove the gallbladder. In over a million people documented over 20 years, women who consumed more than 5 ounces of nuts a week had a significantly lower risk of cholecystectomy than women who ate less than 1 ounce of nuts each week. Bone health Walnuts are a good source of the mineral copper. Severe copper deficiency is associated with lower bone mineral density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thinner and less dense, making them easier to fracture and break. More research is needed on the effects of marginal copper deficiency and on the potential benefits of copper supplements to prevent and manage osteoporosis. Copper also plays an important role in the maintenance of collagen and elastin, major structural components of the body. Without sufficient copper, the body cannot replace damaged connective tissue or the collagen that makes up the building blocks for bone. This can lead to a range of issues including joint dysfunction. Walnuts contain a high amount of manganese. Manganese has been shown to prevent osteoporosis in combination with the minerals calcium and copper. Magnesium, another mineral in walnuts, is important for bone formation as it helps with the absorption of calcium into the bone. While manganese and copper supplements may provide quantities of minerals that can be harmfulTrusted Source, getting these minerals through the diet is thought to be good for bone health. Epilepsy Rats with manganese deficiency have been shown to be more susceptible to seizures. People with epilepsy have also been found to have lower whole blood manganese levels than those without epilepsy, although a manganese deficiency is not thought to cause epilepsy. More research is needed into whether manganese supplementation would benefit people with epilepsy. Walnuts in the diet Nuts have a high-fat content, and so they are prone to becoming rancid. Rancid nuts are not unsafe but have a sharp flavor that people may find unpleasant. Keeping walnuts in their shells in a cool, dark, and dry place can improve their shelf life. Kept in a refrigerator below 40 degrees Fahrenheit or in a freezer below 0 degrees Fahrenheit, they can be stored for over a year. If you want to store them at room temperature, freeze them first at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or less for 48 hours to kill any pests. Share on Pinterest Sprinkle walnuts on a salad to add flavor, texture, and nutritional value. Top salads with chopped walnuts Make homemade granola with a mixture of nuts, seeds, and dried fruit, using walnuts Make a pesto sauce using walnuts and use with pasta or flatbread Top yogurt with chopped walnuts and fruit Try these healthy and delicious recipes developed by registered dietitians: Cinnamon-roasted brussels sprouts with walnuts Whole-grain gnocchi alfredo with spinach and walnuts Apricot and walnut trail mix Walnut bread Risks and precautions Some researchers have concludedTrusted Source that consuming walnuts does not lead to weight gain. However, walnuts are dense in calories, and people are advised to consume them in moderation to reduce this risk. A high consumption of walnuts has also been linked to diarrhea. This could be after a person eats a large quantity of walnuts, because of the high oil or fiber content, or because they have a sensitivity, for example, in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A 1-ounce serving of walnuts contains about 14 half-walnut pieces. People who are allergic to nuts should not eat walnuts. If the person develops a rash or hives or difficulty breathing after eating walnuts, medical attention should be sought. Children should not consume pieces of nut, or they should be supervised while doing so, as this can lead to choking. Walnuts can be a healthful addition to the diet. A diet that is balanced overall and followed alongside an exercise regime is best for health.
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